RECYCLING SURVEY WSCC
13 June 2024
Survey QR code_4 .png


July 4th General ELECTION message from Chichester District Council
11 June 2024

As you will be aware, the General Election will take place on Thursday 4 July. Many changes have been made to the election process over the past couple of years and so it is important that you are aware of how this may affect you.

Voters now have to reapply for postal votes more regularly and people will be able to cast fewer proxy votes. Both postal and proxy voting allow people to cast ballots without going to a polling station in person.

Voters now have to reapply for a postal vote every three years. Previously, voters did not have to show ID if voting by post, but under the new rules, an online identity check has been introduced for all applications for all absentee voting — which covers both postal and proxy voting.

Proxy voting allows people to authorise someone else to vote on their behalf. The changes mean that there is now a limit to the amount of people someone can be a proxy for. You can act as a proxy for two people. If you vote on behalf of UK voters who live overseas, you can act as a proxy for up to four people (but only two of those can live in the UK).

If you wish to vote by post, you can now apply online at:www.gov.uk/apply-postal-vote.The deadline to apply for a postal vote is 5pm on Wednesday 19 June. You must also be registered to vote by 11.59pm on Tuesday 18 June. If you visit the council offices or a polling station when handing in postal votes, you will need to sign a declaration form. Due to this, please do not leave them at our reception without signing the declaration form, or post them through our letterbox, because we will be unable to accept them. However, if you post your form back to us by Royal Mail – this is not required.

If you need someone to vote on your behalf, you can also apply online atwww.gov.uk/apply-proxy-vote. The deadline is 5pm on Wednesday 26 June. You must apply for a proxy vote for every election.

I also want to remind you that if you are voting in person you will need to show photographic ID to vote. Accepted forms of ID include a UK, European Economic Area (EEA) or Commonwealth passport; a UK or EEA drivers' licence; and, some concessionary travel passes, such as an older person's bus pass or an Oyster 60+ card. The full list can be found atwww.electoralcommission.org.uk. Voters will be able to use expired ID if they are still recognisable from the photo. You must also have ID if you are voting on behalf of someone else.

If you don't have any of the accepted forms of ID, the deadline to apply for a free voter authority certificate is 5pm on Wednesday 26 June. Please visit:www.gov.uk/apply-for-photo-id-voter-authority-certificate or request a paper application form from our Elections Team by emailingelections@chichester.gov.uk or call01243 521010. Please remember to supply a hard copy photo or electronic photo with your application. The team will assist you if you are unable to supply your own photo or need help applying.


On Thursday 4 July, polling stations will be open from 7am-10pm. If you’re not sure where to vote, then you can find your local polling station here:https://wheredoivote.co.uk/.For more information about the elections, please go to:www.chichester.gov.uk/electionsThe Electoral Commission also has lots more information on voting and the elections, which can be found at:www.electoralcommission.org.uk/voting-and-elections Following the election, you can also find the results at: www.chichester.gov.uk/electionresults


Best Wishes

Diane Shepherd

Chief Executive at Chichester District Council

Plaistow Pond Jetty Works
28 May 2024

The works to the Jetty at Plasitow Pond are being carried out from 29th May to 31st May inclusive. Please avoid the area if you can.


Proposed Duck House - Plaistow Pond 1.JPG

6th June 1944 to 6th June 2024 -80th Anniversay D -Day
15 May 2024

Events are being staged across West Sussex to commemorate the 80th anniversary of D-Day in June and in recognition of the county’s role in preparations for the Normandy Landings.

On 6 June 1944, or D-Day, one of the most ambitious military operations of all time was launched by Allied Forces with the invasion of Nazi-occupied western Europe. In the build-up, thousands of troops were billeted in West Sussex. Residents are invited to learn more about these historic times via one of West Sussex Library Service’s online resources, or to mark the anniversary by attending an exhibition or other event.


D day.jpg

Chichester District Council Notice of Submission of the Chichester Local Plan 2021 to 2039
03 May 2024

CHICHESTER DISTRICT COUNCIL

Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 and Regulation 22 of the Town and Country Planning (Local Planning) (England) Regulations 2012

Notice of submission of the Chichester Local Plan 2021 to 2039

Notice is hereby given, in accordance with the above regulations, that Chichester District Council submitted the Chichester Local Plan to the Secretary of State for Levelling up, Housing and Communities on 3 May 2024

The Local Plan submission documents, supporting documents and evidence can be viewed on the council’s website at:https://www.chichester.gov.uk/localplanexamination

The following submission documents can also be viewed at Chichester District Council Offices, East Pallant House, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 1TY during normal opening hours: 09.00 – 16.00 Monday to Friday

  • Chichester Local Plan 2021-39: Proposed Submission (Jan 2023)
  • Submission Policies Map- Schedule of Proposed Changes(Jan 2023)
  • Sustainability Appraisal and Non-Technical Summary (Jan 2023)
  • Habitats Regulations Assessment (Jan 2023)
  • Duty to Cooperate: Statement of Compliance (April 2024)
  • Statement of Consultation (Regulation 22 (c)) (April 2024) and
  • Council’s suggested modifications schedule with appendices (April 2024).

The Chichester Local Plan will now be subject to an independent examination conducted by a Planning Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State. This is a continuous process running from the date of submission through to receipt of the appointed Planning Inspector’s Report. Once confirmed, details relating to the examination process will be advertised, made available online and sent to all respondents.

To assist the Planning Inspector through the examination, an independent Programme Officer has been appointed. The Programme Officer works on behalf of the Inspector to organise and manage the administrative and procedural matters of the examination and will be responsible for any communication with respondents during the examination. The Programme Officer’s contact detail are:

Kerry Trueman, Chichester Local Plan Examination, Pendragon House, 1 Bertram Drive, Meols, Wirral, CH47 0LG

Telephone: 07582 310364

Email: programmeofficer@chichester.gov.uk

Please note that this is not an opportunity to make further representations. The Programme Officer will contact representors if the Inspector wants them to submit further material or take part in specific hearing sessions.

Parking on the High Street Plaistow
29 February 2024

The Parish Council realises parking is at a premium at times near the Village Stores and school but would greatly appreciate it if you would avoid parking across the Ducdane entrance on the High Street Plaistow. The owners have to enter and exit at all times of the day and sometimes with a trailer attached to the back of a truck. Parking even slightly across the entrance prevents the owners entering or leaving their driveway.

Thank you.

Book To Recyle-From 12th February 2024
30 January 2024

From Monday 12 February 2024, you will need to book to visit all Recycling Centres in West Sussex.


Slots can be booked 14 days in advance and on the same day if slots are available.


westsussex.gov.uk/BookToRecycle Telephone 01243 642106

 

People interested in building their own home in Chichester District urged to join council register
04 October 2023

People interested in building their own home in Chichester District urged to join council register


People who are interested in building their own home in Chichester District are being urged to join the district council’s Custom and Self-Build Register.

All local authorities must keep a register of any individual or local community groups who want to obtain land to build their own homes and they must take this demand into account when preparing local plans. Chichester District Council is encouraging those interested to join its register for free at www.chichester.gov.uk/article/36087/Register-your-interestfor-custom-and-self-build-housing

“As a council, we are very keen to create more opportunities and help local people and communities come up with their own housing solutions, including self-build and custom build for everyone in the Chichester Local Plan area,” explains Councillor David Betts, the council’s Cabinet Member for Housing. “This is why our register is so important — it enables us to find out where people would like their plot to be and the type of house that they would like to build.

“It’s also worth pointing out that if you’re interested in building in any of the areas in our district which are based within the South Downs National Park (SDNP), then you’ll need to register on their website at: www.southdowns.gov.uk/planningpolicy/self-build-custom-build

In addition, the council is running a survey to gather the views and aspirations of those looking to build their own home in the district.

Councillor Betts says: “The survey takes around five minutes to complete and the feedback we receive will really help us to map out and improve delivery of the right plots in the right locations. It asks the type and size of plot that people are after; the type of house that people are considering building; and the minimum number of bedrooms they would like. We are also asking about people’s preferred locations; the sort of custom and self-build project that they are planning; and whether there are any particular barriers preventing people from progressing their projects.”

The survey is available at: https://online1.snapsurveys.com/customandselfbuild until midnight on 30 September 2023.

A self-build home is where someone directly organises the design and construction of their own home and can include DIY homes; contractor-built homes; kit houses; and, community projects.

Custom build refers to projects where a specialist developer is employed to build a home, to someone’s specifications. They find the site; prepare it; and, help to arrange the finance. The design of the build may be bespoke or chosen from a range of standard options.

Another option that some people opt for is to work with a group of other self-builders on a community project, where the group works on a small number of properties together.

“There are certain areas in the country where self-build properties have really taken off, and we are keen to get the most up-to-date picture we can of what the demand is within Chichester District,” adds Cllr Betts. “For some people self-build is a more affordable route to owning their own home which also meets their specific needs. Typically, self-build homes are around 25 per cent cheaper than buying a new home from a developer and currently, 13,000 people a year in the UK manage to build their own homes while self-built homes account for between 7% and 10% of all new homes built in the UK.”

People interested in self-build can find out more information on Chichester District Council’s website at www.chichester.gov.uk/customandselfbuildhousing can email selfbuild@chichester.gov.ukif they have any specific questions.

Want to build your own home?
08 September 2023

People interested in building their own home in Chichester District urged to join council register


People who are interested in building their own home in Chichester District are being urged to join the district council’s Custom and Self-Build Register.

All local authorities must keep a register of any individual or local community groups who want to obtain land to build their own homes and they must take this demand into account when preparing local plans. Chichester District Council is encouraging those interested to join its register for free at www.chichester.gov.uk/article/36087/Register-your-interestfor-custom-and-self-build-housing

“As a council, we are very keen to create more opportunities and help local people and communities come up with their own housing solutions, including self-build and custom build for everyone in the Chichester Local Plan area,” explains Councillor David Betts, the council’s Cabinet Member for Housing. “This is why our register is so important — it enables us to find out where people would like their plot to be and the type of house that they would like to build.

“It’s also worth pointing out that if you’re interested in building in any of the areas in our district which are based within the South Downs National Park (SDNP), then you’ll need to register on their website at: www.southdowns.gov.uk/planningpolicy/self-build-custom-build

In addition, the council is running a survey to gather the views and aspirations of those looking to build their own home in the district.

Councillor Betts says: “The survey takes around five minutes to complete and the feedback we receive will really help us to map out and improve delivery of the right plots in the right locations. It asks the type and size of plot that people are after; the type of house that people are considering building; and the minimum number of bedrooms they would like. We are also asking about people’s preferred locations; the sort of custom and self-build project that they are planning; and whether there are any particular barriers preventing people from progressing their projects.”

The survey is available at: https://online1.snapsurveys.com/customandselfbuild until midnight on 30 September 2023.

A self-build home is where someone directly organises the design and construction of their own home and can include DIY homes; contractor-built homes; kit houses; and, community projects.

Custom build refers to projects where a specialist developer is employed to build a home, to someone’s specifications. They find the site; prepare it; and, help to arrange the finance. The design of the build may be bespoke or chosen from a range of standard options.

Another option that some people opt for is to work with a group of other self-builders on a community project, where the group works on a small number of properties together.

“There are certain areas in the country where self-build properties have really taken off, and we are keen to get the most up-to-date picture we can of what the demand is within Chichester District,” adds Cllr Betts. “For some people self-build is a more affordable route to owning their own home which also meets their specific needs. Typically, self-build homes are around 25 per cent cheaper than buying a new home from a developer and currently, 13,000 people a year in the UK manage to build their own homes while self-built homes account for between 7% and 10% of all new homes built in the UK.”

People interested in self-build can find out more information on Chichester District Council’s website atwww.chichester.gov.uk/customandselfbuildhousing can emailselfbuild@chichester.gov.ukif they have any specific questions.

Fly tipping - make sure you don't get into trouble
21 August 2023

Fly tipping is an offence that CDC take very seriously. Not only does it ruin the landscape of our beautiful district, but it also poses an environmental risk and costs more than £350,000 of taxpayers’ money to clear up every year.


CDC have unfortunately had to clear up some very big fly tips in our district recently, including the largest soil fly tip we have ever had to deal with in Woodberry Lane, Westbourne. This is something CDC are keen to tackle, by working with you. Fly tipping is a crime, and we need your help in our fight against it.

One of the most important things you can do to help, is to make sure that anyone you employ to remove and dispose of your household waste is licensed as a waste carrier with the Environment Agency. By law, you are responsible for any waste produced on your property — known as your ‘duty of care.’ It means that whether you’ve finished a DIY project; been clearing out unwanted household items; or have been busy sprucing up your garden, it’s down to you to make sure that your waste is disposed of safely and legally.

If you ask someone to remove your waste, it’s vital that you use a licensed waste carrier and ask for a waste transfer note as evidence. If you don’t do this, and your waste is fly tipped by someone who is not licensed, you could receive a fixed penalty notice of up to £1,000 for not disposing of your waste properly. The person who dumped the waste will also be fined.


You can check if a waste carrier is licenced by checking their waste carrier licence number on the Environment Agency’s register by visiting their website at: https://environment.data.gov.uk/public-register/view/index or calling: 03708 506506. If they do not have a licence, please make sure that you do not use them. If they are licensed and you use them, always ask what will happen to your waste and make sure that you get a waste transfer note and receipt for your waste and keep these as proof. If you decide to get rid of your waste yourself, make sure that you take your waste to a registered site. You can find your neared site and its opening times at: www.westsussex.gov.uk/land-waste-and-housing/waste-and-recycling


Another way you can help us, is by reporting any fly tipping, or any information you may have regarding one, at: www.chichester.gov.uk/flytipping. With your help, we have been able to take action against those who commit these crimes by issuing fixed penalty notices. We also have the option to prosecute the offender if further action is required.

We are also continuing to work with Sussex Police, the Environment Agency and other government agencies to hold joint action days where commercial vehicles are stopped and checked. Using the powers from all agencies, action is taken to make sure that commercial operators are legally operating and disposing of waste responsibly.

The joint action days aim to disrupt the activities of those looking to fly tip materials in our beautiful district and ensure that potential fly tippers know that there will be consequences. By working together with other agencies we are able to be more effective and target areas where we know that there is an issue with fly tipping. Find out more about the countywide campaign at: www.westsussex.gov.uk/land-waste-and-housing/waste-and-recycling/recycling-and-waste-prevention/recycling-news/lets-scrap-fly-tipping/

You can access more information on fly tipping by visiting our web pages at: www.chichester.gov.uk/flytipping. If you are keen to help us keep our district looking clean and beautiful, why not pledge your support for our award winning Against Litter campaign. From reporting hot spot areas for dog fouling or fly tipping, through to adopting an area and becoming a community clear-up hero, you can get involved and find out more at: www.chichester.gov.uk/againstlitter


Best Wishes

Cllr Jonathan Brown

Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Environment Strategy at Chichester District Council

Book-a-Bus – the new, flexible transport option for rural areas
26 July 2023

Book-a-Bus – the new, flexible transport option for rural areas

54954 21.07.23

Getting around the county has become even easier with the introduction of Book-a-Bus, a new flexible, on-demand bus service launched by West Sussex County Council.

Book-a-Bus is a demand responsive transport system, which will serve the more rural areas in the county that currently have limited or no traditional bus service available. The new service will operate within set zones and offer passenger pick-up in a location closer to them and travel to their destination all for the same price as a standard bus fare, currently capped at £2 per trip until October 2023.

Book-a-Bus launches today, with the first zone encompassing the rural area between Chichester and Petworth, where two types of service will be available to passengers. The existing 99 service remains a semi-flexible service that incorporates some fixed stops and the ability to deviate within pre-defined areas and can be booked seven days in advance. The second service, called the “99 Flex”, is a fully flexible service with no conventional timetable or route, instead operating based on the bookings it receives via the Ride Pingo app or by phone.

Three additional zones are currently being explored, all serving those communities where conventional bus travel is limited. These include rural areas north of Petworth and north-west of Chichester and villages in the Barnham, Eastergate and Westergate area not served by frequent conventional bus services. The three additional zones will operate on a fully flexible model to provide passengers with a travel option that suits their needs. While travel will be restricted to starting and ending within the same zone, there are several onward connections to travel by bus or train.

This new flexible service is part of the Bus Service Improvement Plan, a county council initiative, funded by central government, that aims to make it easier and more attractive for residents and visitors to travel by bus.

Councillor Joy Dennis, Cabinet Member for Highways and Transport, said: “Maintaining a sustainable and prosperous economy in West Sussex is a priority for us in the council and is part of Our Council Plan. Improving our transport network with better bus services supports this priority.

“The flexibility of Book-a-Bus is vital for keeping our residents in rural areas connected with their communities and to provide continued access to key services, including healthcare, education, shops, and leisure facilities. The service follows an on-demand rideshare approach, allowing for travel around popular locations at a time that’s convenient for them.

“Although currently only available in areas between Chichester and Petworth, we are exploring expansion to more zones very soon.”

Compass Travel Managing Director, Chris Chatfield, the operator for the first zone, said: “Book-a-Bus is a great new way to travel across the county and will give more flexibility to the county’s residents and visitors.

“Ensuring the ease of travel for our passengers is a priority for us. Our buses are fully accessible with low-floor access and a designated space for wheelchairs on board. Our drivers are highly trained and can offer extra support at pick-up points and at the destination.”

To “Book-a-Bus”, download the Ride Pingo app or call our call centre at 01243 858854. Bookings for the fully flexible service can be made for up to five passengers per trip subject to availability. Anyone can use the service, anytime between 7.00am to 7.00pm, Monday through Saturday excluding Bank Holidays.

For more information on Book-a-Bus, visit www.westsussex.gov.uk/book-a-bus

West Sussex Beekeepers' Association - help spot the Asian Hornet
20 July 2023

Help spot the Asian Hornet


West Sussex Beekeepers' Association are raising public awareness of the non-native Asian Hornet which is devastating honey bee colonies in France and the Channel Islands and could be headed to the south of England, due to its proximity to the French coast.

Defra has a very active project in place to ask the public to help identify any Asian Hornets that have arrived  - a small number have already been spotted in Kent in 2023. 

Please open the information poster attached for further information.

GB Non-Native Species Secretariat

‘Think Before You Throw’
17 July 2023

‘Think Before You Throw’ to increase recycling in West Sussex

54931 20.07.23 03


A new campaign designed to thank residents and boost recycling rates has been launched by the West Sussex Waste Partnership.

The ‘Think Before You Throw’ campaign promotes what can and can’t be recycled, the importance of putting the right item in the right bin, and tips on how to reduce, reuse and recycle materials more confidently.

A new animated video series has been produced to show what happens after a bin is collected, how recycling and waste are processed, and how to recycle materials that aren’t collected within your recycling and waste bins at home.

Cllr Deborah Urquhart, West Sussex County Council Cabinet Member for Environment and Climate Change, said: “Thanks to our residents, last year we reused and recycle over 200,000 tonnes of waste in West Sussex. This is a fantastic achievement but there are still many items going into rubbish bins that could be recycled.

“We’re asking people to ‘Think Before You Throw’, especially when it comes to materials such as black plastic pots, tubs and trays, empty aerosols, and other items that can go in special collections at home such as small electricals.”

The campaign will also remind people that recycling should be:

  • CLEAN - free from food and drink leftovers - a quick rinse will often do.
  • DRY - keep your recycling bin lid shut – soggy paper and cardboard can’t be recycled and can stick to other items or clog up machinery when sorted.
  • LOOSE – not tied up in plastic bags, as the machinery cannot sort these.

The West Sussex Waste Partnership, formed of West Sussex County Council, all district and borough councils and Biffa, work to collect, transport, and dispose of West Sussex residents’ recycling and waste.

Kevin Carter, Chair of the West Sussex Waste Partnership and Head of Waste at Chichester District Council, said: “This is a great opportunity for residents to find out about what can and can’t be recycled as well as learn about the journey their recycling and waste takes, from being picked up outside their homes to the final destinations for processing. We’re excited to talk about the technology we have access to here in West Sussex that helps us reduce waste going to landfill and allows us to recycle even more.”

You can watch the campaign videos and find out more about reducing, reusing and recycling all you can at www.westsussex.gov.uk/ThinkBeforeYouThrow


WSCC - Investing in Better Roads
17 July 2023

Investing in Better Roads

Investing in better roads

West Sussex County Council is investing a further £4.5 million into maintaining the county’s highways and roads following a sharp increase in the number of safety defects and issues being reported by our residents.

This gives a total boost of £14.5 million to funding for highways operations with the rest being made up of the £7 million increase in funds for road maintenance from the Council’s capital budget, and £3 million allocated to the county by central government for pothole repairs. We will continue to monitor the impact this increased funding has on the condition of the road network and will review if further investment is required.

Last year, West Sussex experienced one of its hottest summers, which was then followed by higher-than-average rainfall from September to January combined with extremely cold periods in the winter months. These extreme fluctuations in the weather caused repeated expansion and contraction of the road surfaces, which led to a higher-than-normal number of potholes forming.

Over the past four years, the County Council has received 15,800 reports about potholes on average per year. Within the first 5 months of 2023, we have received 22,000 reports of potholes and this number will continue to grow as the year progresses.

In order to make best use of resources, West Sussex County Council has introduced a number of proactive measures to try and tackle the ongoing problems faced by those who use our approximately 4,000km of road network.

The agreed funding will be used to provide resources to repair potholes including additional gangs working on the road network and procurement of an additional road patching machine, bringing our total to three road patching machines operating within the county this year. We will also be carrying out drainage works and refreshing signs and lines across West Sussex to improve visibility and safety.

Cllr Joy Dennis, Cabinet Member for Highways and Transport said: “We understand the frustrations felt by those who use our county's roads over the poor conditions found in some areas and the impact this can have on their journeys. Please know that we feel that frustration too and are working hard to make improvements.

“This year, the County Council has agreed to exceptional one-off funding of £4.5million which is in addition to our agreed yearly budget for road maintenance. I am confident that this will enable us to tackle the majority of the current backlog of repairs through the summer months and provide smoother journeys to residents.”

Road users can report potholes using our online form. Please provide as much detail as you can about the size and exact location to help us to respond quickly. https://www.westsussex.gov.uk/roads-and-travel/report-a-pothole-online/

Tree planting scheme to continue in Chichester District
09 June 2023

Successful tree planting scheme to continue in Chichester District

Chichester District Council’s ‘Tree Chichester District’ scheme is being extended thanks to a share of an additional £2m of Government funding, which aims to investigate ways to increase tree cover in communities across the country.

The Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) has announced that it is awarding £2 million to continue its Trees Outside Woodland programme of research, with the aim of testing new ways to boost tree numbers outside of woodland areas and to strengthen biosecurity. This second phase of the programme will be delivered in partnership with The Tree Council, Natural England, as well as five local authorities, including Chichester District Council.

The programme aims to ensure that new and healthy trees continue to be planted in local communities, improving people’s health and wellbeing, and helping to mitigate the effects of climate change.

Councillor Jonathan Brown, Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Environmental Strategy at Chichester District Council, says: “This additional Government funding is fantastic news for the district. It will enable us to continue our successful Tree Chichester District scheme, which has already seen nearly 25,000 trees planted across the district since its launch in 2021. In total, we’ve been able to support 175 individual tree planting projects to date.

“This success has been achieved through a variety of different projects delivered as part of the Tree Chichester District scheme, including free tree and subsidised tree schemes. These initiatives made free and subsidised trees available to residents, community groups, schools, parish councils, charities, businesses, landowners, and tenant farmers to plant in their local area.

“We have also funded five community orchards in Selsey, Chichester and Fishbourne; 15 planting projects on private land; the enhancement of two community tree nurseries in West Wittering and Selsey; and three mini urban forests, which provide a dense cover of native trees in a smaller area to help boost biodiversity. As part of this, we’ve been delighted to work with, and support, organisations such as Fishbourne Roman Palace, the East Broyle Residents’ Association, the Manhood Wildlife and Heritage Group, and the Selsey Community Forum, to name a few.

“We will receive the new funding in September and are currently planning the schemes and projects that this will enable us to deliver for the benefit of our local communities.

“The additional investment will help to support the council’s work to protect and enhance the local environment. Tree planting is an integral part of our Climate Emergency Action Plan, which sets out a carbon reduction target of 10% year on year until 2025 within the district. You can find out more this at: www.chichester.gov.uk/climatechange.”

“While increasing tree cover is important, we are also encouraging people to protect and nurture existing mature trees that are safe and healthy. Trees are a precious natural asset and, as a natural carbon sink, are a vital part of the fight against climate change.”

People can find more information about the Tree Chichester District scheme by contacting the council’s dedicated Tree Project Officer by emailing: treescheme@chichester.gov.uk.

Recycling Centres extend opening hours across West Sussex
30 March 2023

Recycling Centres extend opening hours across West Sussex

200731 dcool wsccshoreham-39

Recycling Centres across West Sussex will soon be switching to extended summer opening hours – giving residents extra opportunities to recycle their household waste.

As many of us set to work tidying our gardens or clearing out our homes, recycling facilities are often very busy over the summer period. Extending the hours will help us cope with the extra demand.

From 1 April Recycling Centres will be open for longer on the following days and times:

• Billingshurst: 9am to 6pm - Monday to Wednesday and Saturday to Sunday

• Bognor Regis: 9am to 6pm - Monday to Wednesday and Saturday to Sunday

• Burgess Hill: 9am to 6pm - Monday to Sunday

• Chichester: 9am to 6pm - Monday to Sunday

• Crawley: 9am to 6pm - Monday to Sunday

• East Grinstead: 9am to 6pm - Monday, Thursday to Sunday

• Horsham: 9am to 6pm - Monday, Thursday to Sunday

• Littlehampton: 9am to 6pm - Monday, Thursday to Sunday

• Midhurst: 9am to 6pm - Monday, Thursday to Sunday

• Shoreham-by-Sea: 9am to 6pm - Wednesday to Sunday

• Worthing: 9am to 6pm - Monday to Sunday

These hours will remain in place until 31 September and will not be affected by the bank holidays. Please remember that you will need to book a slot to attend the any recycling centre now.

Same-day appointments are available through the County Council’s Book to Recycle system, with some appointments available 14 days in advance if needed. There are a limited number of appointments per day and they are booked on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. You can book a slot at www.westsussex.gov.uk/booktorecycle

Deborah Urquhart, County Council Cabinet Member for Environment and Climate Change said: “By extending our opening hours during the warmer weather even more residents will be able to visit their local recycling centre.

“Our Book to Recycle system significantly reduces waiting times, it takes less than a minute to book your slot and same-day bookings are available. Recycling all you can reduces waste, saves energy, helps tackle climate change, and is an important part of our environmental commitments in Our Council Plan. I would encourage everyone to recycle as much of their waste as possible.”

You can recycle almost anything at Recycling Centres, from plant pots to vacuum cleaners. For a handy A-Z and more information on how to book an appointment, go to: www.westsussex.gov.uk/recycling

CDC - demand Southern Water cleans up its act
06 February 2023

District Council teams up with local authorities across the South East to demand Southern Water cleans up its act


Chichester District Council is one of more than 40 councils across the South East that have joined together to hold Southern Water to account over pollution and infrastructure failings.

The group was set up in response to issues including flooding; sewage backing up into people’s homes, gardens and roads; the ongoing problem of discharges into rivers and waterways; and the inability to deal with additional development.

The meeting was held on Tuesday 31 January when the group discussed action and experiences to date across the full Southern Water network.

Southern Water is responsible for wastewater across the region and for drinking water in other parts of the southeast.

Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Planning, Cllr Susan Taylor and Cllr Penny Plant, Cabinet Member for the Environment, at Chichester District Council both attended the meeting.

Susan said: “It’s not just Chichester District Council which is frustrated at the issues and concerns, which lead back to Southern Water’s failings.

“All of the councils attending the meeting were united in their pledge to hold Southern Water to account and press for immediate action, particularly in relation to upgrading and investing in the sewerage system.

“We have been challenging Southern Water in relation to their engagement with both the planning process and the environmental impacts of discharging sewage into Chichester Harbour for some time. This includes previously filing an official complaint about the company to the Water Services Regulation Authority, Ofwat. We believe the way forward is to work with our local authority partners to apply significant pressure on Southern Water.

“We are also involved in a Three Harbours Summit, whichinvolves Southern Water and representatives from the council and other local authorities, along with relevant agencies such as Natural England, the Environment Agency, Chichester Harbour Conservancy, Langstone Harbour Board and Sussex Wildlife Trust. This is a positive step towards working together to help improve the harbour for future years to come. The aim is that this group will have a positive impact on Southern Water’s five-year investment plan.”

Penny adds: Only recently, senior representatives from Southern Water, the Environment Agency; Ofwat and Natural England were invited to the council’s Overview and Scrutiny Committee meeting so that they could be challenged on some of the serious problems our residents are facing.

“These include the recent flooding and associated drain surcharging; sewage and subsequent discharges into the harbour and water courses affecting the water quality of Chichester Harbour; delays in upgrades to the sewerage network; and slow responses to planning applications.”

“Our residents deserve better. Unfortunately, we do not have the direct power to regulate Southern Water or require it to address its rather lengthy list of failings. But as local authorities working together, we can do our utmost to apply pressure to seek the required action needed to end this catalogue of failings.”

All councils agreed that regular meetings should continue to take place at the end of the meeting.

CDC - update on key steps taken to tackle climate change
01 February 2023

Chichester District Council provides update on key steps taken to tackle climate change in the district

Chichester District councillors have been updated on the positive progress of a number of key actions that have been completed, or are underway, to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions across the district.

As part of the council’s Climate Emergency Action Plan, a detailed progress report has been produced. This highlights over 60 actions that the council has taken, or is currently taking, to reduce its own carbon emissions by putting climate change at the heart of its operations, as well as introducing campaigns and projects to help residents, businesses and organisations to reduce their carbon footprint too.

There are a range of actions including the introduction of two new electric vehicles to the council’s refuse collection fleet, which is the council’s biggest source of emissions. The council is producing an inspirational film about climate change made with Chichester school students and a professional film company.In addition, two specialist officers have been appointed: one to provide greater support to small and medium-sized enterprises looking to become more sustainable, and the second to increase engagement with not-for-profit organisations and households to help them reduce their emissions.


These are just a few of the actions that the council has been taking since it declared a climate emergency in 2019 and set a district-wide target to aspire to of 10% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions every year until 2025. The Government released the 2020 emission figures last year, which showed that the district’s emissions had reduced by 8.7%.


“From investing in electric refuse collection vehicles and working to improve the energy efficiency within council buildings, and increasing tree planting within the district, the council is progressing a number of major projects to help reduce carbon emissions within its own work and across the district over the coming months and years,” says Councillor Penny Plant, Cabinet member for the Environment and Chichester Contract Services at Chichester District Council.

“While the council’s own carbon emissions equate to less than 0.5% of the district’s emissions as a whole, the council decided to set an ambitious carbon reduction target to act as a call to action and to help unite the efforts of individuals and organisations across the district. Although it was recognised that this would be challenging to meet, the target was chosen to reflect the urgent nature of the current climate crisis and the emission reductions that the council felt needed to be worked towards, rather than what was easily achievable.

“Much of the reduction seen in the 2020 figures will have come from reduced road transport and is likely to be linked with Covid restrictions. The fact that emissions in the district did not reduce further, despite the huge lifestyle changes caused by Covid restrictions, shows the scale of the challenge we face when tackling the effects of climate change.”

The council set a similar 10% reduction target for its own operations. These emissions are estimated by the council so this data is available sooner, but the time period is different. For the first year of the target (October 2019- September 2020), the council is reporting a 12% reduction in its emissions. One of the biggest reductions was achieved at Westgate Leisure Centre, which has a swimming pool and is the council’s second biggest source of emissions.


For the second year (October 2020-September 2021), the council is reporting a further 4% reduction. Emissions for the following year (October 2021-September 2022) will be estimated in the next couple of months. However, it will not be until the year after (October 2022-September 2023) that a number of key projects aimed at reducing emissions will start to make an impact and that the benefit of this work will start to be seen.


Penny adds: “I’m really pleased to say that a major project to reduce emissions from Westgate Leisure Centre will be completed soon. The large pool hall roof has been covered with solar panels that will generate electricity and heat, with further electricity generating panels (PV panels) on other roofs at the centre. These — together with a newly installed air source heat pump — should reduce the centre’s emissions by almost a quarter. Our partners, Everyone Active, which run the council’s leisure centres, are reducing energy use in other ways, for example, through switching to LED lighting and turning lighting off when not needed.

“We have also recently completed a project to improve the energy efficiency of the council’s older block of short stay accommodation, which we anticipate will reduce its energy use by 54%, leading to reduced emissions. We’re looking forward to receiving our two new electric refuse vehicles this spring, which will significantly reduce our emissions over the coming months and years.


“Looking forward, it is difficult to predict future emission figures. Weather and post-Covid lifestyles affect emissions, as well as changes to the services offered by the council. For example, in March 2022, the council expanded its short-stay accommodation for residents facing homelessness. The building has been built with biodiversity in mind and with PV panels and two electric vehicle charge points. However, it is a new facility that will add to the council’s emission consumption.

“The council’s regenerated St James’ Industrial Estate will also re-open this year, which will help support local businesses and boost the local economy. It is important to note that this will impact on the council’s emission figure even though the materials used and the installation of PV panels and electric vehicle charging points will mean that the new site will have a reduced carbon footprint.

“Setting a target that requires the council to make a 10% reduction in the first year, and further 10% yearly reductions, is challenging. Projects and timelines often need to adapt, as the Covid pandemic has clearly demonstrated. Lists of options need to be drawn up, assessed for feasibility, costings obtained, and funding secured. The delivery times for energy efficiency and renewable energy equipment — even common components — can be very long, and installers have to be found. However, it is important to set an ambitious target so that we are focused on what we are striving to achieve.

“Although the council accounts for less than 0.5% of the district’s emissions, we must all play our part, and at the end of last year, we put together a video highlighting some of the many actions that we’ve been taking — you can watch this here:www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmNH9_2g4SY&t=34s.”


Further information on the work that the council is doing on climate change, and to view the council’s Climate Emergency Action Plan, visit:www.chichester.gov.uk/climatechange

Dealing with damp and mould
21 December 2022

Chichester District Dispatch

Dealing with damp and mould

Social housing within Plaistow and Ifold

CDC take the standard of Housing in the district seriously. CDC strongly encourage any social housing tenant who has damp and mould issues - or any other concerns regarding their property - to report this to their social housing provider.

Tenants can use these links:

Report a repair | The Hyde Group (hyde-housing.co.uk)

Making a complaint | The Hyde Group (hyde-housing.co.uk)

Private rented housing within Plaistow and Ifold

You should report damp and mould to your landlord in the first instance. If you do not get a satisfactory response, you should make a complaint and can then approach the Housing Ombudsman. You can also approach CDC for action if necessary.


***

Recently, you may have become aware of the heart-breaking death of Awaab Ishak, through the reporting of the recent inquest into this tragedy. The two-year-old died in 2020, after exposure to mould in his house in Rochdale. This is something that has shocked everyone across the country.

Due to this, CDC thought it was really important to remind people how to deal with damp and mould and highlight where you can seek help if the problem persists. During the winter months, our homes can often suffer from damp and mould due to condensation. This is caused by moisture released into the air from everyday tasks, such as cooking, showering, and drying clothes. You can reduce the moisture in the air by ventilating rooms; drying clothes outside; placing lids on saucepans; wiping down surfaces where moisture settles; making sure that air vents aren’t blocked; and keeping your home warm.

However, this isn’t the only cause of damp. Penetrating damp, which can be caused by leaking pipes or overflows; rain seeping through the roof where tiles or slates are missing; or blocked gutters, is another cause. Rising damp, which can be caused by a defective, or a lack of, damp-proof course, also causes mould to appear. CDC have produced a leaflet, which offers more detailed advice on mould and how to tackle it, which you can find at: www.chichester.gov.uk/media/36430/Damp-Leaflet-Nov-2021/pdf/Damp_leaflet_Nov2021.pdf

If you rent your home and are experiencing issues with damp and mould, please report this to your landlord as soon as possible. If the problem worsens, or you don’t hear back from your landlord within the response time indicated when you reported it, please contact our housing team for help and advice by emailing housingstandards@chichester.gov.uk or by calling 01243 534565.

All landlords have an obligation to meet certain housing standards to ensure that their tenants’ homes are safe, secure, clean and in good condition. You can find more information about these expectations and the standards rented properties should meet at: www.chichester.gov.uk/media/32456/Lettable-standards/pdf/Lettable_standard_leaflet_web_accessible_version.pdf.If you do have concerns, please make sure that you take action as soon as you can. It’s important that what happened to Awaab never happens again.

A joint project between CDC with Arun District Council has helped to reduce the number of privately rented properties classed as ‘cold homes’ in both Chichester and Arun districts.

Last autumn, both district councils made a joint bid for government funding so that they could support landlords to carry out works in order for their properties to meet the Government’s new Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES). The project targeted properties with an Energy rating of F or G because these are properties which are not legally allowed to be privately let. Any property being privately let as a home must be rated at E or above.

Officers identified 139 properties across the two districts which did not meet the new standards and over the past year they have been working with a number of landlords to help them comply. This has involved work such as installing double-glazing, replacing boilers and increasing insulation. I’m especially pleased that this work has been completed in time for the winter, when priority groups, such as older people and young children, are more at risk from the cold. If you are interested in finding out more about the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards, please visit: www.gov.uk/guidance/domestic-private-rented-property-minimum-energy-efficiency-standard-landlord-guidance

Finally, CDC have also agreed to spend £47,500 from a Government grant on a new project to help combat homelessness. As part of the year-long pilot, we will refer up to 20 clients to Beam, a social enterprise organisation, which specialises in helping people who have experienced long-term issues with gaining employment. You can find out more by visiting www.chichester.gov.uk/latestnews

Safer Bus Stop Project
18 October 2022

Update April 2024

The Bus shelter at the Village Stores Ifold is now complete and Phase 1 of this project is complete. The second phase to buiold a Shelter in Plasitow is now in progress, the shleter is currently being built away from site.

Update September 2021

On 23rd June 2021, the Parish Council resolved to apply for the 2021/22 New Homes Bonus (NHB) grant funding from Chichester District Council (CDC) to continue the Safer Bus Stop Project (Phase One) of installing a shelter in Plaistow and an improved shelter and entrance rejuvenation at The Drive, Ifold. This was the Parish Council’s successful NHB application in 2020/21 (as detailed below). The Parish Council has three years to spend the grant funding and can apply for NHB funds in relation to the same project over multiple years.

On 15th September 2021, a special meeting of CDC's Grants and Concessions Panel considered the application and were supportive of the bid. Consequently, up to £2,158 will be available to Plaistow and Ifold Parish Council to be used in relation to this project. 

The letter is attached below. The Parish Council will sign the Agreement at its full meeting on 13th October. 


**UPDATE**

The Parish Council is pleased to confirm that the Chichester District Council's Grants and Concession Panel was supportive of its application to the New Homes Bonus (Parish Allocations) and up to £3,924.72 will be available to Plaistow and Ifold Parish Council to build the two bus shelters. The confirmation letter, Agreement and application can be found below, attached to this notice.

This notice will be updated with details of the project as it progresses.


**ORIGINAL NOTICE (Sept)**

Residents of Plaistow village, who use the local bus service regularly, have written to Plaistow and Ifold Parish Council asking that a bus shelter and seating be provided on the grass verge next to the telephone kiosk outside the Sun Inn.

One of the Parish Council’s ongoing projects is to provide safer bus stops throughout the Parish to increase the use of the school and other public bus services. The sites identified for Phase One (1) of the project have been specifically identified by residents as local priorities.

Plaistow village does not currently benefit from any bus shelters whatsoever. The bus to Horsham services the village four (4) times per week and is frequently used by between six (6) and eight (8) elderly residents (80 years or older). The bus uses the Sun Inn car park to pick up and drop off passengers. The only available bench seating is situated on the opposite side of the road from where residents board and alight the bus.

The provision of a bus shelter in Plaistow will enhance the well-being of elderly residents, as it will offer sheltered seating from inclement weather on the correct side of the road. Users of this bus service have been identified by the Parish Council as in greatest need of support, due to age and their reliance on public transport to access vital services which cannot be met within the village itself. Consequently, the Parish Council is prioritising this shelter in Phase One (1) of the wider Safer Bus Stop Project.

Although the designated bus stop is on the opposite side of the road, the bus in fact uses the Sun Inn car park to pull in off the highway, therefore the shelter will be situated near to where the bus stops. This will offer the greatest support to users, as they will not have to cross the road on a blind bend and dangerous junction. The shelter and car park benefit from an existing pathway (there is also a salt bin at the location to ensure the pathway and shelter are not hazardous during the winter months). This element of Phase One (1) dovetails with the Parish Council’s recent adoption (July 2020) of the BT telephone kiosk, also at the location. The community has requested that it is converted into a book exchange, which will be implemented and managed by the Plaistow Village Trust.

The centre of Plaistow village is in a conservation area; therefore, the shelter has been designed, free of charge, by a local chartered surveyor who specialises in historic and conservation buildings. The shelter has been sympathetically designed to emulate the local style and surrounding buildings, incorporating feather edge weather board, green oak bracing, and plain clay tiled roof.

As part of the Parish wide Safer Bus Stop Project, the Parish Council intends to update existing shelters, or install new ones which are all of the same style and design, in keeping with the rural visual amenity and aesthetic of the Parish, to provide community homogeneity without compromising on safety and functionality.

The grass verge identified as the most suitable location for the shelter is owned by the National Trust (NT). The Parish Council is currently working with the NT and a Lease Agreement has been drafted. The Parish Council is also working with the Local Planning Authority and has been advised that it can take advantage of Permitted Development Rights conferred by Part 12 Class A of the Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 2015. WSCC’s Highways Department have assessed the site and deem it safe and suitable for a shelter to be located.

The shelter will be built by WSCC’s Communities & Public Protection Directorate volunteer scheme. This specialist team of trained volunteers support communities who wish to undertake locally identified community led projects. The Parish Council will encourage members of the community to join the team and help build this and other shelters in due course. The building material will be responsibly source from local independent businesses. The team have built other bespoke bus shelters within West Sussex and specifically in conservation areas (Rogate, Easebourne and Findon Valley).

The Parish Council organises two (2) community litter-pick/maintenance days each year. The bus shelter will be cleaned as part of these established community events. Any issues arising at other times will be addressed, as necessary. The shelter will be insured by the Parish Council.

If you would like to discuss any aspect of this project, please do not hesitate to contact the Parish Clerk, Catherine.

Additionally, if you would like to make representations to Councillors, you are invited to join the full Parish Council meeting at 7:30pm on Wednesday 9th September via Zoom. Please refer to the meeting agenda published on the Parish Council website, or public notice board outside the Winterton Hall for more information. Alternatively, please email the Clerk before 4pm on 9th September, if you wish for any written representation to be read out at the meeting in your absence.

To view the shelter design and location plan, please click on the two 'Download Notice' buttons below.

Woodland Trust - Ancient Tree Inventory
08 July 2022

Woodland Trust - Ancient Tree Inventory


The Woodland Trust has established a database called the Ancient Tree Inventory (ATI), which maps the oldest and most important trees in the UK. 

The ATI is crowdsourced, and depends on members of the public submitting information on the trees they feel are noteworthy to increase the size of the database and help protect our valuable tree heritage. There are already more than 180,000 trees listed, but there are tens of thousands more to add.

Plaistow and Ifold Parish have some trees already listed, including 'Old Man Cecil', the Sessile Oak dated from around 1650 on Plaistow Village Green.

More information on the Ancient Tree Inventory, including how to search the database for notable and ancient trees local to you, along with guides to recording and submitting an entry to it can be found at https://ati.woodlandtrust.org.uk/.

Nature-friendly road verges help pollinators across West Sussex
02 June 2022